Prime Minister celebrates Baptist Day of the Spiritual Crier: look how far we’ve come

Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley commemorated the Spiritual Crier’s Baptist Liberation Day, highlighting the accomplishments of his ancestors and encouraging people to be tolerant and respectful of one another.

March 30 recognizes the day in 1951 when the Crier’s Prohibition Order of 1917 was revoked. Trinidad and Tobago remains the only nation to celebrate this community.

In a press release, Dr Rowley said he often felt a surge of emotions during this time as he tried to imagine the historic road the early members of the Spiritual Shouter Baptist faith traveled in Trinidad and Tobago.

“This is the sad story of a people seeking legitimacy, a right to worship what they felt deep within, and a defense of their sense of self. It was first a small struggle, then a movement of resistance in a world which had considered the African as unworthy of respect, “primitive”, “barbaric”, “uncivilized” – a stereotype perpetuated by the European world, which still lingers in some minds,” he said.

Congratulating members for their steadfastness, he said he looked forward to the construction of the Spiritual Baptist Cathedral for which the government has pledged $10 million

“I look forward to the day when we can meet to celebrate in the shade of the building and, as God wills, to meet in praise in your own cemetery which you now have within your reach.”

Dr Rowley also urged people to emulate Spiritual Baptists who, despite persecution, granted forgiveness to their oppressors.

“At this stage, what is required of all citizens is first an acknowledgment of this need for tolerance, then a search for forgiveness and healing, which the Spiritual Crier Baptists have shown us .”

“We should each try to reach within ourselves, seeking beyond that place within, in which we can all live each day with the sayings of Christ in which we can find love , and then show, to some extent, tolerance and respect for those around us, individually, collectively and as a people, as a nation.”

The Prime Minister recalled the writings of Franz Fanon who wrote “The Dammed”; Derek Walcott who wrote “A Far Cry from Africa” ​​which tells a story of “beast on beast violence” and the “upright man” who sought “his divinity by inflicting pain” on others; and Professor Lloyd Braithwaite – one of Trinidad and Tobago’s first sociologists who wrote about Willy Richardson’s poem which told of despair:

We are men without a country

We are men without faith

We are men without a future

We are men, waiting for death

Acknowledging the progress made, Dr Rowley said today was a time to celebrate “the magnificence of our dress, the haunting high notes of our melodious voices and above all in the embrace of faith by the younger generation of spiritual Baptist youth, ably guided by generations of ancestors.”

While acknowledging the struggles and suffering endured by Spiritual Baptists, the Prime Minister noted that other religious and ethnic groups residing here have traveled their own difficult roads to success and legitimacy.

attempts to imagine the historic route traveled by the earliest members of the Spiritual Crier Baptist faith in Trinidad and Tobago.

“This is the sad story of a people seeking legitimacy, a right to worship what they felt deep within, and a defense of their sense of self. It was first a small struggle, then a movement of resistance in a world which had considered the African as unworthy of respect, “primitive”, “barbaric”, “uncivilized” – a stereotype perpetuated by the European world, which still lingers in some minds,” he said.

Congratulating members of the faith for their steadfastness, he expressed the hope that the construction of the cathedral, for which the government has pledged 10 million dollars, will be made to accommodate the faithful.

“I look forward to the day when we can meet to celebrate in the shade of the building and, as God wills, to meet in praise in your own cemetery which you now have within your reach.”

Dr Rowley urged members of the public to emulate Spiritual Baptists who, despite persecution, granted forgiveness to their oppressors.

“At this stage, what is required of all citizens is first an acknowledgment of this need for tolerance, then a search for forgiveness and healing, which the Spiritual Crier Baptists have shown us .”

“We should each try to reach within ourselves, seeking beyond that place within, in which we can all live each day with the sayings of Christ in which we can find love , and then show, to some extent, tolerance and respect for those around us, individually, collectively and as a people, as a nation.”

The Prime Minister recalled the writings of Franz Fanon who wrote “The Dammed”; Derek Walcott who wrote “Far from Africawhich tells a story of “beast-on-beast violence” and the “upright man” who sought “his divinity by making others suffer”; and Professor Lloyd Braithwaite, one of Trinidad and Tobago’s first sociologists, wrote of Willy Richardson’s poem which told of despair:

We are men without a country

We are men without faith

We are men without a future

We are men, waiting for death

Acknowledging the progress made, Dr Rowley said today was a time to celebrate “the magnificence of our dress, the haunting high notes of our melodious voices and above all in the embrace of faith by the younger generation of spiritual Baptist youth, ably guided by generations of ancestors.”

He recognized tit struggles and suffers the spiritual Baptists who are part of the socio-historical matrix of Trinidad and Tobago.

Although he acknowledged that other religious and ethnic groups residing here have traveled their own difficult roads to success and legitimacy.